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The Power Of Paying Positive Attention (POPPA)

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I admire people who have a reputation for making people feel noticed and special. Presidents have been lauded for their ability to remember people’s names and making them feel as if they were the only people in the room (John F. Kennedy and Bill Clinton). Others also, they have the keen sense to recognize and comment on any changes in a person’s appearance or behavior. You may be such a person. You have an eye for detail. You know the right questions to ask, and the appropriate comments to make. These individuals have the power of observation and paying positive attention.

Additionally, individuals have a knack for always pointing out when something is wrong. But, we will spend time focusing on the people who have the power of paying positive attention to something that is right. These individuals may have the gift because it comes to them naturally, so they have the knack for it. Or they may have acquired the knowledge of the impact it has on people. They have the knack or the knowledge. Therefore, they have the intuition or received instruction on the value of paying positive attention to others.

We could describe this skill with an acronym (Power Of Paying Positive Attention). It can have a profound effect on productivity, performance, productivity and relationships.

When you watch something carefully, continuously over time, you formulate a mental baseline of how things are. This is cemented in your memory. If something changes, alarm bells signal a deviation from the norm. You may not know what changed immediately, but you are aware that something is different. Observation and perception notify the brain.

POPPA is a great skill to demonstrate in the workplace, home and school. It helps to establish and strengthen relationships. The power of paying positive attention causes you to focus on people and every aspect of their beings. You look them in the eyes. You notice them and ask questions about the quality of their work. You remember their names. You ask questions about the pictures in their workspace and other symbols in which they have pride. You may comment on their backgrounds, families, education and interest as appropriate. They feel important. You value their contributions at work and are authentically concerned about them as individuals with families and a life outside of work. You see the employee, peer or classmate as a total person with long term professional and personal interests.

If you treat people as if they matter, they may ultimately live up to your projections and live up to and exceed your expectations. If you treat people as if they exist and make them feel important, and did not invisible, you will ultimately reap the benefits of an engaged and inspired person.

We are equipped with our 5 senses, highlighted by the senses of sight and hearing to enhance our powers of observation. It does not cost us anything, but a small investment of time to notice someone. If the average human being could walk around with a fictitious cartoon bubble over their head, it would say, “Notice me” or “Please see me.” They want to feel significant, special, substantial, loved and connected.

While observing a sales representative making a presentation a manager noticed that he was obviously preoccupied. There were points in the call when additional information was needed and he was usually very adept at picking up signals and following through with the right questions. After the presentation, rather than point out the obvious oversights, he asked if everything was alright. He discovered that he had personal matters that compromised his thinking and performance. The manager adjusted his coaching accordingly.

A District Sales Manager working with a star performer was confronted with the following situation. During one of her presentations, there was tension in the air on. The sales representative was noticeably reluctant as she was visibly holding back when a strong challenge was required. The company’s reputation was being assaulted and her usually strong personality folded in the moment. The manager asked, “What would you have done if I was not present with you today?” She outlined her strategy and why she did not pursue a more aggressive stance. She told him what she would have said ordinarily if he wasn’t there. She did not want to challenge the doctor in the presence of sales management, so she was reserved.

The manager gave her the following advice. “When I work with you I want to see reality. If I coach behavior that is not your usual behavior I leave feeling that I had a productive day. But my comments would have been a waste of time. You would leave feeling that the words were meaningless because they did not apply to you. If you don’t want me to waste my time, show me what is real and trust the process that I will handle each moment as a teaching and growth opportunity.” The power of paying positive attention allowed him to recognize a change in behavior and to coach to improve performance.

Lastly, there are times in our lives where we give routine responses. We are simply going through the motions in our very busy days. We feature the same words, whether it is in a greeting or part of the key messages delivered in a conversation or presentation. It is important to get these words right, but do not become bored or distracted with repetition. This may cause you to lose focus and fail to pay attention. You may miss an opportunity to connect with someone on a different level and strengthen a relationship. Watch the person’s face and body language to detect the messages they are sending to denote interest or a reaction to your words.

Our interactions in the workplace, at home and in school are environments where we should engage with other people by showing them that they matter. As a species, we want to be recognized and respected, belong and accepted. If we positively and authentically comment on their appearance, behavior, and performance, the compliment will inspire them to work harder to become more competent, which will have a profound impact on their confidence and they will complement your work culture, family, team, and organization.

Copyright © 2017 Orlando Ceaser

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The “I’ve Got Next Mentality”

The basketball courts were teeming with activity. Creative exhibitions of athleticism and teamwork were on display. Individuals were calling for the basketball, as they ran quickly down the court. While the games were in progress, there were players at courtside, who watched the flow of the game and studied all of the elements. These individuals at courtside would invariably shout “I’ve Got Next.”

They wanted everyone to know they were heirs to play the winners. They wanted the power to choose the next game with their own players. These leaders were waiting, biding their time, knowing that eventually, they would have their turn to place a team on the court. If these players did not state their position, players interested in joining the team would ask the question, “Who’s Got Next?”

What is Next? On your journey to success, it is your next move from a series of potential tactics. It is an action that advances you along the continuum to your goal? In life, Next could be a variety of options. It could be a promotion, a project, assignment, a tactic that supports your overall objective. Next is something that you need to help you achieve your goal. It could be a missing ingredient, a necessary component, an idea crucial for success.

Individuals on the sidelines understand the next person in line has the responsibility to pick the next team. Their role is to assemble the next team to play the winners of the contests. Daily, you have wrestled with what comes next.  On your career path, you must plan for and anticipate your next move and the succession of moves to follow. A leader striving for additional responsibility, when a new job is posted, is tempted to scream, as on the playground, “I’ve Got Next.”

The person who has Next, watches and evaluates all talent on the court. They are interested in the best players on the losing team. They are aware of individuals who were not in the game but have the ability to make major contributions. The person who has Next must be a talent evaluator. They study all aspects of the person’s game from the standpoint of handling personnel, skill level, character, and teamwork. They are a student of the game, which is one of the 10 principles in my Unlock Your Leadership Greatness books.

When evaluating your career, it is important to have the “I’ve Got Next” Mentality. This mentality involves the following;

  • Having a goal and game plan
  • Awareness of talent on the court and at courtside
  • Selecting the best talent – presenting your best self
  • Qualified with the necessary skills and abilities to develop self and others
  • The ability to say no to players you don’t feel are worthy
  • Possesses a mindset that you can grow into the job and conquer the reigning competitive champion

It is important to know the “I’ve Got Next Mentality” is not about entitlement. It is not simply based on seniority. If others do not feel that you belong on the court, you will not be taken seriously. Additionally, in business, you may not be promoted if you are not prepared and qualified. You may receive complaints when certain players are not selected, especially if they are friends who are less than talented. Some people eliminate this problem by having a core group of talented players as potential members of the team.

“I’ve Got Next”, gives you the opportunity to plan your strategy and select the best players. But unlike the playground, there are a number of challengers who may feel the next opportunity belongs to them. You must apply for the job as if the job is yours with the “I’ve Got Next Mentality.”

In the workplace, you may also select your own team, but favoritism and nepotism can work against you if the team members are not a good fit. Some people are always in a recruiting or talent gathering mode. This enables them to stockpile talented players until the need arises.

When you take over the reins as the leader of your department, team or section, you are ready to take on the competition. You are ready to serve your client at a level superior to the current champion on the court. If you are successful in unseating the champion, it enables you to get off the ground and stay on the court. If you’re unsuccessful in your initial efforts for the assignment, you will learn from the venture. This experience will put you in a better position to be closer to your goal the next time.

Visualizing the team you would like to put on the court is the primary responsibility of the leader. When you say “I’ve Got Next”, you immediately begin to assemble your team. You have already seen in your mental rehearsals, the type of organization you want to create.

There is a certain amount of confidence that comes from thinking about leadership growth with an “I’ve Got Next Mentality.” You have worked hard and look forward to the opportunity to select and coach your team. During the game, you may function as a coach, allowing each individual to play to their strengths.

There are several lessons gained from the “I’ve Got Next Mentality”. They are as follows:

  1. You have a goal
  2. You plan to execute your strategy
  3. Talent is needed to fill your roster
  4. Evaluate the players who can help you
  5. Be prepared to handle those who cannot be beneficial to you
  6. Familiarity with talent due to the known quality of known quantities
  7. Secure their agreement to participate

When choosing a profession or an academic institution, you also have different fields, departments, and majors in which you could work. On the job, you must position yourself to acquire certain assignments and special projects. These key assignments, projects, and internships will drive your focus to your goal.

In the back of your mind, you are planning a series of steps to the top of your profession. Intermediate steps may be necessary as stepping stones to your ultimate objective. Always put yourself in a position to say I’ve Got Next to the next position on your career journey, to reach your goal.

Copyright © 2017 Orlando Ceaser

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First Quarter – New Year’s Resolution Reboot

We are approaching the end of the first quarter. How is your New Year’s resolution going for you? Usually, about this time, many resolutions have been abandoned and kicked to the curb. The good intentions have fallen by the wayside and people walk away as defeated as they were this time last year. However, a seemingly failed attempt at a change in behavior for self-improvement can be salvaged with persistence and the right perspective.

For example, health club attendance usually spikes at the beginning of each year.

People are usually well engaged, as measured by attendance in classes or in the workout facility. The first three weeks are filled with enthusiasm. However, this year the enthusiasm waned after the first week. What is going on? Why are people disenchanted and disengaged so quickly? Is this indicative of results in other areas where resolutions are generated? Are they becoming harder and harder to sustain? We need to think of a different way of approaching our resolutions to give them greater sustainability.

We need to look at New Year’s resolutions as is a promise; and we like to keep our word. We need to see our resolutions as a computer program that simply needs to be realigned. What is really required is a resolution reboot.

Additionally, we should not confine our performance into a tight time frame, but to see it as a work in progress. A resolution reboot is necessary and admissible as evidence of our long term commitment. It is permissible as a continuation of the implementation of your growth strategy. We will reboot as many times as necessary until the program is fully functioning and running smoothly.

We must see our resolution as a part of an overall plan. Included in this strategy is our propensity to stop and start until the task is completed. It is our nature to not necessarily get something right the first time.  We have a tendency to collect a series of false starts, a few glitches before we are running like a well oiled machine.

Don’t beat yourself up if the early returns on your performance against your goal are not successful. Humans have a history of persistence until we reach our objectives. From learning how to walk, talk, think and run, the beginning stages did not go as planned.

Many of our goals as defined and described are like New Year’s resolutions. They had a rough beginning, but eventually became a part of our daily routine. We must approach our current resolutions simply as goals with things need to work on.

When a computer is not acting according to plan or specifications, the manufacturer usually asks us to reboot the program to see if it corrects itself. Whenever I have a computer issue, invariably I am asked to turn off the equipment and reboot. The same happens when I have a problem with my cable service. I am asked to please turn off the system for 30 seconds and turn it on to allow it to reboot itself. Many times this corrects the problem, as if the machine knows what is appropriate and aligns itself with the proper behavior. There is something therapeutic about shutting yourself down, rethinking your position, recommitting yourself to the goal and reminding yourself what success looks like.

You may need to try the same procedures to restart your resolutions, while keeping your goal in mind.

The early stages of your New Year’s resolution should not be seen as a performance failure, but as a temporary setback to regroup and rededicate yourself. Even if you are one of those individuals who backed away from your exercise goals after the first week, the game is not over. Tell yourself that your discontinuation was expected. It is a part of your well-planned routine to keep you working on your resolution until you get it right.

With the remaining days in the month and year, stay dedicated to your resolution. You know it is needed and the right thing to do for your development.  View the early returns as data and make the necessary course corrections to get you back on track. What worked for you in the early stages?

I remember training for the marathon and following the Galloway method. He suggested continuing to move forward, even if you had to stop and walk, but eventually you will reach your goal. So get Ready – Recommit – React – Reboot.  Keep moving and each  successful step in the right direction will get you closer to your overall goal.

Copyright © 2017 Orlando Ceaser

 

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Leadership – 7 Acts of Love

unlockgreatnessbook

An excerpt from the book Unlock Your Leadership Greatness which speaks to the key principles in developing relationships that lead to higher levels of performance for personal and team excellence.

Leaders don’t like to use the language of love when speaking about their constituents. However, caring for their people can enable them to obtain outrageous output from people who will joyfully capitalize on opportunities and achieve better results. Seven Acts of love can generate power by demonstrating compassion for those responsible for making the leader look good.

  1. Leaders want you to develop and deliver your best work
  2. Leaders want you to be interchangeably self sufficient and interdependent as needed to achieve your goals
  3. Leaders will praise you when you excel and instruct you when necessary
  4. Leaders will admonish you when you are wrong and astonish you with service and generosity
  5. If you leave for greater opportunities, leaders will encourage your journey, admire your risk taking and wish you success
  6. Leaders will continuously invest in themselves, so that they will have more to give to you
  7. Leaders will connect you to a cause bigger than yourself

Act l – Leaders want you to develop and deliver your best work

Leaders who care about their people want them to reach their potential in a role that best suits their talents. They provide opportunities to gain experience in assignments that stimulate personal growth. These assignments are chosen to stretch their employees by extending their spectrum of skills.Leaders are not satisfied if their followers are performing below their abilities. Leaders take it personally. If they can’t extract the desired effort from their team, they feel responsible, because they are accountable.

Act ll – Leaders want you to be interchangeably self sufficient and interdependent, as needed to achieve your goals

The role of the leader is to teach their people to fish, but also to fish in community. They want them to acquire the skills and knowledge to learn how to function on their own. A manager cannot stand over their people’s shoulders at all times monitoring their behavior. Leaders have to trust their people, but trust is based on a track record of success. This is accomplished through instruction and inspection. A crucial expectation is for people to work in teams, because the results are superior when a group puts their brains and brawn together to tackle the problems of the workplace. Most assignments require interacting with co-workers, customers and classmates. Knowing when to work in isolation and how to work in a team is a notable competency.

Act lll – Leaders will praise you when you excel and instruct you when necessary

People respond favorably to praise. They want their effort to be appreciated, but their effort must achieve a satisfactory result. A leader who loves and cares for their people wants them to know that they are valued members of the team. Additionally, the leader knows it is their responsibility to intervene when feedback is required. A leader who cares about their people wants them to have the benefit of expert instruction and a realistic assessment of their performance. The feedback and instruction must be delivered in a timely manner. Timeliness refers to instant correction when mistakes are made and frequent evaluations of progress, rather than waiting for an annual performance review.Individuals who feel their leadership is committed to them will reciprocate by giving their highest level of engagement. Leaders are aware of the phenomenal results from a team of highly engaged individuals.

Act lV – Leaders will admonish you when you are wrong and astonish you with service and generosity

A leader who cares for their people will institute disciple for behavior that violates policies or standards of excellence. People are aware of expectations and consequences, which are administered fairly to all employees. John Stout, a British theologian said “Love without truth is too soft; Truth without love is too harsh; our objective is to speak the truth in love”. A leader must have the emotional strength to deliver tough information, especially in the name of achieving excellence.The leader must intermittently astonish their people with generosity. This can be in the form of compliments for excellent behavior or random acts of praise, favors and material gifts.

Act V – If you leave for greater opportunities, leaders will encourage your journey, admire your risk taking and wish you success

Invariably, a leader will lose members of their team to other organizations or departments. The initial emotional response borders on anger, disappointment and betrayal. They gave time, effort and resources to help them grow; now they show their appreciation by changing roles. These emotions are natural; however, if the leader ever cared for the person, their feelings should not have been contingent upon them staying with them forever. If they are an expert leader and developer of people, at some point they will not have enough opportunities to satisfy everyone needs for promotional growth. Leaders should be content with seeding the marketplace with excellence guided by their hands. By releasing them they may be able to return someday or offer opportunities to others. A leader should want only the best for those who serve them well, with a history of very high performance.

Act Vl – Leaders will continuously invest in themselves, so that they will have more to give to you

I relocated seven times during my professional working career. These were excellent opportunities for acquiring additional skills and personal growth. Our children were perennially the new kids on the block, but they gained new skills. For example, we exposed our children to travelling, sports and musical instruments. The experiences allowed them to discuss many subjects and play multiple sports and instruments. I also benefited from the moves. I cultivated new aptitude, gained insight into many different jobs which made me more valuable. As I poured new skills into myself I was able to be a greater resource to my people. To speak firsthand about job assignments, relocations and the adjustments needed to be successful in today’s corporate environment was an advantage to my people.

Act Vll – Leaders will connect you to a cause bigger than yourself One of the yearnings of the heart is to be a part of something greater than self. A leader who can link individuals to such a cause or vision will be highly respected. People will be energized to wake up each morning knowing that they make a difference. When direct reports realize they are connected to something that makes the world a better place, it elevates their spirit and sense of purpose. Self actualization is achieved when each person is working at their optimum capacity. When a leader cares, followers will go the extra distance to make everyone successful.

Copyright © 2011 Orlando Ceaser

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Personal development – Learning for others

A librarian posed a question to me that I heard many times in my career.” Are leadership or other training programs of any value?” She has seen many managers attend training programs and return completely unchanged. She wondered if the programs were a complete waste of time and money.

The success of training programs is determined by the manager and their supervisor. The manager must attend the training session with an objective in mind. There should be something in the content that they feel will help them become a better manager/leader. Their supervisor should hold them accountable and ensure that they return from the training session with the answers to two questions;

  1. What did you learn?
  2. How will you use this information to be a better performer?

It is optimal for the manager to have these questions in mind before attending the training, to prompt them to search for critical information, techniques and relationships. It is important for them to be open to how they will benefit, how it will change their current behavior and how it will influence their present goals and performance objectives. There may also be aspects of the training they can use to target specific individuals/teams.

If managers return from a training program and nothing has happened in their behavior and vocabulary, we can deduce that the program was not used it to its maximum benefit. Additionally, some managers feel that information is power and are therefore reluctant to share. However, managers should incorporate the techniques and vocabulary from the training into their everyday speech. They should share with their peers and direct reports, subject matter from the training. They should show how their peers, direct reports and supervisors can benefit from the information obtained.

Training should be seen as crucial for the individual and everyone within their sphere of influence. Acquiring knowledge, experiences and resources should be for the benefit and distribution to self and others. The same holds true when acquiring other information, such as reading a book. When you are reading you are not reading for just one. You are reading to develop yourself and learning for others.

A manager relocated seven times during his career in the pharmaceutical industry. There were a number of occasions when he wondered why he had to move so often, when others achieved similar milestones without as many moves. It dawned on him one day that when he moved, it increased his exposure, experience and expertise in many areas. This additional information allowed him to be of greater value to his people. He realized that growth was not just about him and this increased his eagerness to gain information for the benefit of others.

There are several other strategies managers can use to ensure that a transformation occurred when they attend training programs. They are as follows:

  1. Multiple uses of the training programs

Managers can be shown the value of the training beyond their immediate job; it increases the likelihood of them utilizing the training and gaining practice in the principles and techniques. For example, a training program around situational leadership contains principles that can be used at work, home, community meetings, places of worship and associations they belong to. If they use the information in these multiple sessions it increases the value and return on investment, regarding time, energy and money spent.

  1. Share with others

When managers make it a practice to have meetings to discuss the information learned that multiply the value of the training. Many individuals sit down with their teams to review the information learned and to discuss how it will be used to improve individual and team performance. The successful implementation and transfer of this data may actually have the people look forward to them learning new things, because they will benefit from the new knowledge.

  1. Ask about the program

If someone returns from training and do not share information, ask questions. They may be flattered or encouraged that others are interested enough in the training to want to know more. People may inadvertently hold their manager accountable by asking questions about the value of the program, the changes in the organization because of the program and how the information can be used to make them better employees?

  1. Use the information to improve yourself

Recognize that information learned by their manager can make them a better performer. If they have ambition to rise within the organization, what they learn can help them improve as well. Even if they do not have plans for advancement, it is imperative that they learn as much as possible in their current role. The more they know the more valuable they are to self and the organization. Bear in mind that the current appointment environment is fluid. It is impossible to stand still without being passed by or passed over. Expectations are higher everyday and the more skilled they are, the more likely they are to regain employment in the event of a job loss.

discretionary-effort-model

The second question that came out of my discussion with the librarian was, “Why should people change, if there boss is not changing?” There are many individuals feel they will do just enough to keep their job and maintain sufficient raises and increase in performance rankings. People feel better when they are functioning at their best. When they are fulfilled and engaged, they are working on all cylinders and the work can be fun.

There is a factor known as discretionary effort. Aubrey Daniels International says “Discretionary effort is the level of effort people could give if they wanted to, but above and beyond the minimum required.” An increase in discretionary effort could be brought on by positive reinforcement and feeling as if they are a part of the team. However, if the manager is not providing positive reinforcement, it is still imperative for the individual to engage in self defense activities. These actions involve a making themselves more valuable to the organization, which in turns increases their value to potential employers. As they take control of their careers, implementing their strategy for advancement could help them tremendously in the long run.

In summary, when managers realize that there development contributes to the development of others, this multiplying effect gives additional power to their job. Additionally, you should always grow, because it is good for you. You should make yourself better, because being better positively influences everyone around you, regardless of your manager’s perspective on the training they attend.

Copyright © 2017 Orlando Ceaser

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The 4th Monkey – “Do No Evil”

We grew up with the story of the three monkeys. I imagine that many of us have the same interpretation of what they represent. We were exposed to pictures or statues. One monkey had his hands over his eyes, the second monkey with hands over his ears and the third monkey’s hands were over his mouth. They were see no evil (Mizaru), hear no evil (Kikazura) and speak no evil (Iwazura). There were actions and behaviors demanded of us based on the three monkeys, but nothing was said about the fourth monkey. The fourth monkey was do no evil (Shizaru).

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The stories of the four monkeys were popular in Japan in the 17th century. Their origin is between 2 and 4 BC in China. The Storyologer web-site (www.storyologer.com) has this account of Mahatma Gandhi who carried around a small statue of the three monkeys.  “Gandhi had a statue of three monkeys in three different postures. One was shutting his mouth with his hands, the other was shutting his ears similarly and the third one had put hands on his eyes. A visitor to his house became curious and questioned Gandhi about the various postures of the monkeys. Gandhi politely replied, ‘The one shutting his mouth tells us that we should not speak ill of any body. The one shutting his ears tells us that we should not hear the ill of any body. And the one shutting his eyes tells us that we should not see the ills of any body. If we do so, we will have all goodness and nothing but goodness.’

Travelers will often find local markets with carved depictions or artwork featuring the three monkeys. My wife was able to purchase an angelic model of the same concept. There are three angels; one was covering her eyes, one was covering her ears and the other was covering her mouth. However, the fourth monkey was not shown. The 4th monkey, when pictured, is usually shown folding his arms (the body language of being closed) or covering his crotch to signify inactivity.

It is fascinating the different interpretations of the four monkeys. In Buddhist tradition it meant don’t spend your time preoccupied with evil thoughts. In the West it relates to not facing up to our moral responsibility, for example turning a blind eye. But in my household, the monkeys were presented to us as a model of proper behavior. Our parents wanted us to identify with the images, to supplement our moral code.

See no evil (Mizaru)

We were told to pay attention to people and location(s). The idea was that if we were in the right location, we would minimize seeing trouble develop before our eyes. This was applicable in school and at work. We were instructed against being at the wrong place at the wrong time. We were also told not to look for bad things in people or in certain situations. There are people who see bad things when they don’t exist, which could explain the manifestations of bias, stereotypes and profiling. We were not taught to be naïve, but to be careful and respectful.

Hear no evil (Kikazaru)

We were told to shield ourselves from bad language and bad intentions. We should stay away from people who spoke ill of others and gossiped. If we were not in the wrong place we could minimize hearing things that we should not hear. There was an exception: if we could acquire evil information and use it to do good or to help others, that would be permissible.

Speak no evil (Iwazura)

Speak no evil was used to discourage gossiping or speaking ill will about someone. We were told to watch our language and to speak kind words. “If you can’t say anything good about someone, don’t say anything” was a part of this same philosophy. Adults told us that spreading bad news or malicious information could come back to haunt us. We should also, apply this same advice to the workplace.

Some of us have adopted a code of silence in the workplace and would not tell when someone was not pulling their own weight. We would rather silently complain or resign, before talking about a employee who was not working. It is our responsibility to find a way to report injustice, illegal behavior and practices that undermine people and the organization.

One way to break the code of silence is by offering incentives to whistleblowers. These individuals are people who step forward and report unlawful activities in an organization. They are generally paid a 10% bounty if the measure goes to court and fines are levied against the lawbreakers. In neighborhoods where people know the perpetrators of violence, but fail to come forward, there are no such incentives. Residents may be afraid of retribution, as the rationale for their silence.

Do no evil (Shizaru)

The fourth monkey’s actions are truly related to the others. The workplace is a common place for the four monkeys to be used as an operating system. Employee bullying and intimidation, sexual-harassment claims, the presence of racial discrimination and sexually charged language and actions exists in some organizations. Where improprieties and liberties are taken with people’s rights in the form of disrespectful words and actions, there are laws in place to prevent and punish these actions. Employees, who adopt a see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil mindset are not helping to develop a positive company culture or a respectful workplace

Do no evil is a perfect monkey to enforce the values of character and integrity. He reminds us of proper behavior and etiquette. Our choices have consequences and the more we can emphasize a positive corporate culture and a respectful workplace the more effective our organizations will be become. There is conduct and behavior norms which must be identified, emphasized and enforced vigorously. Character will minimize stress in the workplace and reduce the number of lawsuits and discipline related to improper behavior.

How can we create an environment in our workplaces, families and communities, where people are held accountable for their own unlawful actions and the private citizens who come forward can feel safe and protected. If the fourth monkey was modeled, we would have less of a cause to talk about the other three monkeys.

Do no evil should be magnified and connected to many of our guiding principles of behavior.  The Golden Rule and its equivalent in many cultures advise us to treat people the way we want to be treated. The Platinum Rule which asks us to treat people the way they want to be treated. The 10 Commandments implores us not to do a series of acts which could be seen as evil, such as murder, stealing, etc.

We must clearly outline expectations of behavior and the judgment related to them to improve the climate in our organizations, homes and places where people meet. Correct action is essential to achieving healthy results in our relationships.

The imagery and practices espoused by the 4th monkey holds the key to making this possible. I am hopeful that by emphasizing the fourth monkey, we can improve our behaviors, connections, interactions and relationships of all kinds.

Copyright © 2016 Orlando Ceaser

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Loyalty – To be or not to be?

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Loyalty is an awkward discussion topic within organizations. The relationship with our jobs is complicated. Layoffs, reorganizations, mergers and acquisitions, plant/store closings, and outsourcing jobs overseas have a negative impact on employers/employee relations and more row. Managers in some organizations think, “Why should I be loyal to my employees, after all this is business.” Company survival trumps loyalty is their current mindset. Employees wonder if they should stick around.

Additionally, employees who were loyal to their companies find themselves out of work and feel betrayed and used by their former employers.

Loyalty can be defined as allegiance to something or someone. Loyalty is earned and its compliance is given by consent. We are speaking of loyalty in terms of fidelity to your company. We may also view loyalty on several different levels: loyal to your manager, coworkers and team

Loyalty is an intriguing concept. We know what it is and the circumstances where it should be exercised. It is emotional and enhances the value of a relationship. Relationships have expectations. If these expectations are not met or are threatened, loyalty is affected. When loyalty is coerced or forced, people will stay on the job until the right opportunity arrives to ease their conscience as they leave the organization.

We are loyal when someone or something is worthy of our trust. However, when there is a breach of trust, loyalty is retracted.

Loyalty Demonstration

Loyalty must be discussed in the context of equality and reciprocity. After all, reciprocity is a part of the transactional currency of loyalty. The company is providing something to the individual and the individual performs the work commensurate with the salary and the environment. Loyalty involves fairness and keeping your promises. The employee’s level of engagement reflects their level of appreciation for the services rendered. If the employee is treated fairly, allegedly, they will work hard, speak highly and positively about the company and remain a part of the organization. Loyalty is given as long as both parties fulfill their part of the obligation.

A leader who is loyal to their people may fight hard to justify retaining good people at the expense of others. An organization/leader that has a reputation of doing everything to minimize layoffs and retain employees can influence the number of loyal employees who choose to stay and speak highly of the company. Some companies may take less profit, in the short term, and minimize turnover in their organization.

What do you do to develop loyalty within your people? Some may argue that loyalty is not something that you develop, but like trust, is something that is earned. What steps can you implement that will save your business and earn loyalty from your employees? Do you show that you truly value their contributions? Do you adopt strategies that protect your people during the hard times until profit improves? Do you honor your promises and meet their expectations? Discuss the big picture to keep employees apprised of company challenges and performance, where appropriate.

Seeds of defection

Organizations will frequently make decisions and state that they were made in the best interests of the company. Budgets are cut; people are reassigned or displaced in order to improve the bottom line. Some leaders will not search for an alternative view that would spare jobs and careers. Leadership will quickly reduce headcount. This plants the seeds of defection, as people realize they are only a number, a statistic, headcount and a line item on a budget.

A selfish organization risk creating a selfish, culture where people stay or jump based on their individual needs being met. Therefore, everyone is treated as expendable. People respond by acting as mercenaries or hired guns. This removes the stability that people like to experience.

If a company reduces staff, so they can bring them back later, employees become stressed. They are constantly performing emotional gymnastics in a toxic environment. Conversely, if the company goes out of its way to inform and retain people and they know it, they may go out of their way to stay or deliver higher levels of engagement, retention and overall performance, to protect the company and their jobs.

Loyalty used to be defined in the context of fidelity, as it related to staying with an organization long-term. However, there’ve been countless instances where people passed up job offers from other organizations, only to be terminated by their own company. Individuals are angry at themselves for being loyal to a company and then the company does not show the same kind of loyalty to them. When did these stories circulate around an organization, people vow to never let that happen to them if they can help it.

Mindset in Today’s market

What kind of mindset should you have in today’s precarious job market? Should you keep your head down and not worry and everything will be alright and work itself out? Should you be open-minded to the flirtations from other companies promising a better deal? Should you put the word out that you are interested and seeking a different long term relationship? When people approach work with the mindset of the, “it’s just a job,” loyalty can be compromised.

Some people strategically interview internally and externally to keep their interviewing skills sharp. Their rationale is that it keeps them sharp for jobs inside and outside of the company. Other employees interview for ego and the self worth to see if they still have the skills desired by another organization. Others want to test their market value to benchmark for raises.

Loyalty Risks

People are hired who have demonstrated the propensity to jump frequently from job to job. Their track record is firmly stated on the resume. They are hired hands or have a mercenary mentality. They have an unspoken understanding with management that they are there to fulfill an assignment or until they can’t get something better. This may ultimately become a disadvantage.

I was impressed by a young man who fits the above the description. We met between sales calls and he asked if my company was hiring? He was very impressive; He went on to say that he was always looking for a better job. He made a very elaborate presentation of his thought process of always looking out for something better. As a hiring manager, I pondered the risk of recommending or hiring someone like him who was always looking to leave for greener pastures. Loyalty with him would be misplaced and could be detrimental to the survival of the new organization.

Loyalty is a learned trait. It is generally observed and imitated. Individuals learn from an environment where loyalty is practiced. They learn the components and the guiding principles and foundation regarding its use. Both parties in the employer/employee relationship are evaluating the value of the arrangement. Both groups are under enormous pressure to behave in a manner that is considerate of each other.

If a company lays off employees as a last resort, it may be the nature of the business that is the business required it. Employees may not like it, but ultimately will understand.

If an employee receives an outstanding offer from another company that could benefit them and their families, it may be the right decision to take the job. In some industries, it is the nature of the business to change jobs frequently to build a resume of different experiences. In each situation, the ideal objective is to be respectful of each other and perform in the best interests of all parties involved.

Loyalty also mandates that you honor your decisions, whether they are to work for the company, leave the company, hire or release employees; act in a manner that shows you are respectful and deliver the best you can in the relationship. You can always show loyalty by working as hard as you can, as long as you are on the job. An organization may have to reduce staff, as a last option to remain viable as a company. An individual may be faced with the tough decision to leave a job that has good to them; in today’s turbulent times we should respond to these difficult situations with dignity and respect in all roles and for all employees. Loyalty must continue to be an important value for us. However, loyalty is strained and tested; we must combine it with trust to build stronger organizations and relationships that benefits all participants.

Copyright © 2016 Orlando Ceaser

 

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I work for a Monster

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I grew up with a different generation of monsters. The monsters in the movies and television of my day had the same objective as the ones today, to shock and terrify. They strive to literally frighten you out of your mind. Please indulge me for a moment as I ask you to play a game. Answer this question “If my worst manager was a monster, who would they be?” To play along with me you must have a picture of your worst manager, a manager from the past or a diabolical manager you heard about from someone else.

I grew up watching a program called Shock Theater. The hosts were zombie musicians who were probably the inspiration for the look of Michael Keaton in the movie Beetlejuice. The program was a prelude to the Creature Features segments on late night television. There were 4 favorite monsters or categories that dominated the movies in my childhood; the Wolfman, Dracula, the Mummy, Frankenstein and various reptiles or mutated animals that were exposed to radiation. For this segment let’s concentrate on the top four; Wolfman, Dracula, Frankenstein and the Mummy.

My favorite character was Lon Chaney, Jr. who played the Wolfman. He was a frustrated man who was bitten by a werewolf and had to spend the rest of his life howling at the full moon. He was always seeking a cure and looking for sympathy from anyone who would listen to his tale of woe and help rescue him from his fate. He was a normal person during good times, which was during daylight hours and things were going well. However, under pressure, he changed into something frightening and unrecognizable.

He wanted to be different, but was overpowered by the curse. Have you seen the Wolfman Manager in your organization? They appear to be nice, but are tormented by change. Therefore, their full moon experience could be pressure of any kind. Their poor sales results could cause pressure, a difficult boss or skill deficiencies due to incompatibility with their job could turn them into terrible creatures. The Wolfman Manager blames something or someone else for their cruel behavior. They were forced to be tough and it was agonizing for them because it was, out of character and against their temperament. In the presence of their boss, they would reluctantly turned into something horrible, due to fear or the need to become something to match leadership expectations.

Then there was Dracula, the vampire. He was charismatic, smooth talking and mesmerizing. He spoke with a distinctive accent and people were drawn to his charm, appearance and professional demeanor. He was royalty; after all he was a Count. But Dracula was still a blood sucker, a manipulator who planned to render his victims hopeless and under his control. His intent was to drain others until they were no longer of use to him, other than to locate another food source. You may have seen a vampire walking around your company with that same arrogant, cold, uncaring look. The look that says they are interested in you for what you can do for them. The Vampire Managers walk around feeling, as if they would be there forever and no one would discover their secret intentions to victimize others. You may wonder if somewhere, there is a coffin containing their native soil, somewhere hidden in the office.

The Mummy was cursed to guard the tomb or temple of his beloved. He was slow of foot, but was loyal, relentless and powerful. I’m speaking of the older version played by Boris Karloff, not the newer versions found in the Brandon Fraser movies, but the plot is the same. There is a creature driven by an overpowering love and allegiance for the object of their affection. This person within your organization has an undying love for power and ambition, status quo and will destroy anyone who tries to harm or change it. They will blindly institute unethical policies and cover them up, especially if an investigation is pending or inevitable. This individual will persistently pursue anyone who has anything negative to say about the company or anyone they personally admire within the organization. They will practice a technique known as delayed retaliation to seek revenge against their enemies. They will also be the micromanaging monster who slowly follows you and hovers over you.

An organization began a process of offering 360° feedback to its managers. The managers enlisted the help of their peers, direct reports and their supervisor. When they received less than flattering commentary, they smiled and thanked everyone for their contributions. Over the next several months, the Mummy Manager did everything within their power to slowly, relentlessly, strike back against those who offered disparaging feedback. The mummy within the organization is wrapped up, as a metaphor for hiding either their identity or their intentions.

Lastly, there was Frankenstein, named after his creator. He was a collection of body parts, that were sewn together to create a living breathing inhuman being. Frankenstein’s monster was depicted as mindless and easily irritated. He was created to be controlled and to demonstrate the power and influence of the scientist. He was the earlier version of the zombie. Frankenstein became identified with his creation. When the Frankenstein Monster saw his reflection and what he had become, he became angry. He realized how different it was from everyone else and that people were afraid of him. He was deliberately created to be controlled as an example of his creator’s intellect and power. He ultimately turned on his master.

The Frankenstein Manager appears in many organizations as the protégé who was shaped, mentored and created in the ruthless image of their sponsor. He is loyal, as long, as it is a benefit to him, but when they received negative feedback, they will revolt. He is a henchman who follows blindly. Eventually, the protégé will turn on its creator, causing much instruction in its wake. After the monster received or learned all they could from their master, it may cast the mad scientist mentor aside.

Each generation, even the Millenials, has its own monsters; whether it is the Wicked Witch of the East, Aliens, the Predator, zombies, Jason of Friday the 13th or Freddy Krueger from Nightmare on Elm Street, they can be compared to the leadership styles of many of the leaders seen in organizations around the world. The traits of these frightful creatures are found in the leadership practices of some managers who believe they must resort to fiendish tactics or insensitive methods in order to get results. Where there is a monster, there is fear. Where there is fear, there needs to be a strategy to relieve people from the threat of the monster and the power it has over the employees in the workplace. To be successful, you must be wise enough to identify the managers with monster tendencies and develop the right skills and resources to stay safe. When you realize that your manager is a monster, you must act appropriately and find the correct strategy to take care of yourself.

Copyright © 2016 Orlando Ceaser

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Will there be a Mutiny on your watch? Is there a silent rebellion on your team?

People who have been tolerant of oppressive leadership/management behavior eventually revolt.  Mutiny is on their minds and it describes a revolutionary action. In an organization that has owners, principals and stockholders mutiny does not occur by physically taking over a facility or its leadership. It occurs by people determining that they will not give 100%. They will not be totally engaged at work. They will not give their best. Employees will adopt an “over my dead body” mindset, which means they theoretically would rather die than give their total cooperation to an organization that does not respect them. Workers have decided that the company does not deserve their best, therefore their best ideas, solutions and discretionary effort will be withheld.

A sales representative approached his mentor and told him about the dissent in his district. Apparently, the district was fed up with the leadership inadequacies of their District manager. He listed several failures in emotional intelligence and examples of managerial malpractice. He wanted to know the path they should take to bring their discontent to higher authorities. They were going to stage a mutiny. Their mutiny was not going to be a work stoppage nor were they going to physically remove their manager from his position. In essence, they wanted to schedule a meeting with their regional manager on their grievances. They wanted to know if they were going through the proper channels to get results. The team was to meet with the regional sales manager to complain about the District Manager’s tactics and the impact on morale and performance.

The curious part of the discussion was the performance history of the regional sales manager. In his prior role as a district sales manager, his team complained about his management style. He was notorious for lacking emotional intelligence and created an environment of fear and intimidation. He exhibited the same tendencies present in his current subordinate. How sympathetic would he be to their claims about a hostile work environment?

The representative was advised to go through the proper channels. They felt more comfortable contacting Human Resources to state their case. HR, by remit, would investigate their issues and take the necessary actions. Additionally, he was advised to not be seen as the ring leader in this uprising. The Regional manager in question was also notorious for retaliating against individuals who challenged him or stood in his way.

Managers can evaluate their culture through The Know System™ which could provide a simplified look at their environment. The Know System™ featured in the book The Isle of Knowledge is a decision making model which is also useful for individual and group coaching exercises. It is easy to use and allows the participants to accumulate information to enhance the quality of their decisions and discussions. The system is devised from the word Know. The user should ask a series of questions to gather information. Let’s look at 6 words from the word Know and a few related questions that apply to company culture.

  1. Won – What would a winning culture look like to you? What type of atmosphere, level of engagement and customer satisfaction scores would represent success to you?
  2. Know – What do you know and need to know about your culture and the people in your organization? (This can be enhanced with the words who, what, where, when, how and why, if appropriate)
  3. Now – What are you doing now to ensure a healthy habitat? Are you placing priority on the proper indicators?
  4. No – What are you doing that you need to stop doing? What goes against your culture and stated values that you need to say no to? What do your people want you to eliminate or stop doing?
  5. On – You must be vigilant at all times to monitor culture and maintain a proper cultural air quality. What are you doing to track leading indicators of a great culture? How are you measuring your work environment?
  6. Own – Do you own the culture as evidenced by leadership behavior? How are you holding yourself and others accountable? How are you reporting your performance and interest in a strong culture to your people?

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The beauty of our current leadership/managerial landscape is that many organizations have ascribed to the notion of a healthy work environment. There are employee surveys and satisfaction surveys, as well as engagement surveys to take the temperature or climate of the organization. These surveys can uncover problems and managers can be presented with data and held accountable for changing their environment. These surveys are strengthened with direct contact with management and human resources to ensure the environment is conducive for maximum productivity.

Is imperative as a leader to gauge how your people are responding to your direction and the culture in your environment. It is also apparent that many leaders are promoted because they excelled in their previous sales position, but are not cut out for management. You should try to train and develop these individuals, but in some instances it is not a good match and a decision should be made to place the person in the right job.  A worst-case scenario may develop where people mentally abandon the company, but stay on the job, because the company failed to address a main contributor to their toxic culture.

When the organization does not feel like a respectful place, people feel that the company has let them down and cannot be trusted. Mutiny or thoughts of mutiny is an indication that the current culture has failed or is failing many of its workers. They may resort to subversive action and taking matters into their own hands.

Mutiny may show itself as a single silent action called a resignation. Your top performers or the most influential members on your team may leave, causing a chain reaction of departures. Management must be accessible and periodically and personally check the culture pulse of the organization. People must believe that leadership is authentic, transparent and sincere when leaders speak of core values. Trust will be enhanced when people really believe that they are the number one resource in the organization. Otherwise, silent mutinies will going unchecked, unnoticed and leaving people unfulfilled.

Copyright © 2016 Orlando Ceaser

 

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How to use guilt to your advantage?

Rick was promised a promotion. His manager committed the cardinal sin of sharing classified information from recent talent discussions with upper management and human resources. His candidacy for a mid level leadership position was about to yield positive results. However, a new executive arrived from the overseas office and used his considerable influence to put his own person in the job. Rick was devastated to learn the position, he was promised, was going to another individual. His boss was placed in a precarious position. He was apologetic and felt guilty for delivering the premature verdict.

There were two lessons. One was the need to be silent when trusted with confidential information. The second involved what to do when immersed in guilt after the situation blows up in your face. What was his subordinate going to do?

Rick could not complain for this would involve throwing his boss under the bus. Knowing his boss felt guilty, he decided to be a good worker and not compromise his managers’ decision. He was confident that eventually he would be promoted and his boss was an ally who really felt bad about the situation. The boss felt guilty enough to do everything in his power to see that it never happened again. Rick made the most of the additional time in the job. H and is silence and work ethic qualified him for a new assignment.
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In another scenario, a merger placed a number of careers in shambles. The subsequent reorganization came with the requisite confusion and uncertainty. A few individuals who did not receive the promotions they desired were angry enough to express their discontent in a public forum and through the corporate grapevine. Their lack of good judgment and composure made a poor impression on the new managers. It gave valuable insight into their personalities and how they would respond in difficult times. Other individuals were also disappointed, but expressed their loyalty to the company, even though they may have been equally upset. They demonstrated wisdom by stating their disappointment only to their managers, while vowing to work harder for the next promotion. They were able to express their ambition, authenticity and transparency. This approach was appreciated and served as an example of managerial maturity.

Managers have a tendency to provide extra coaching to individuals they like. If they aren’t able to protect their people, they generally feel guilty about their inability to place them in the appropriate jobs at the appropriate time. If the company makes a decision that works against you, you may see it in your managers’ face, even if they don’t express their feelings outwardly. If they are genuinely contrite in a situation that worked against you, you may use that to set up a favorable situation down the road. The manager will appreciate your cooperation and understanding. They may internally feel as if they owe you something, when in reality they don’t.

In most situations, we don’t have very large career impacting decisions that people lose sleep over because they have a negative personal impact on your life. The more mundane instances are usually around appointments and not offering the support or resources necessary when you need them. When someone doesn’t come through as planned or promised, you want to acknowledge the breakdown. You want to gain an understanding that even if it was not intentional, steps will be taken to ensure that it doesn’t happen again. Actually, you’re asking them to do the best they can to help you. They may or may not verbalize this but you walk away with the general understanding of intent to work as your advocate. Let them off the hook and gain their commitment to come through for you in the future.

The style and grace that comes from patience and understanding the pressures on another person will be appreciated in the long run. The guilt issue may be a minor one, but it can be used in your favor.

As stated earlier, guilt is usually accumulated in everyday situations. Can you think of a time when someone may not come through as planned or promised? Anticipate the event and plan your response. Give them some grace, a way out and a show of support, which may pay dividends. They will seek ways to reward you in the future for your understanding and cooperation.

Additionally, can you think of the time when someone was late for an appointment or missed one altogether? How did they respond? Did you sense, there tardiness for the meeting or otherwise falling short of expectations was something that made them feel guilty. People have reputations around punctuality and your forgiveness will go a long way to making them feel remorseful and appreciative

We must acknowledge those individuals who exert a total disregard for you, as it relates to your time, resources and career. They are chronically late for appointments. They will make decisions that hinder your effectiveness and will not apologize when they let you down or stab you in the back. Using guilt in a situation where no one feels remorse is a classic waste of time. You should be very careful around these individuals and cast a large safety network of trusted individuals who will let you know when they are working against you.

When working with individuals who do not respect your time, resources and career, you must be careful not to use the same tactic with them, especially if they outrank you. Your reputation, business acumen and social skills should inspire you to continue to lead by example. Your goal is to achieve results and make others better by becoming a highly effective leader.

In summary, if someone fails in their interactions with you and are genuinely contrite, rather than lashing out in anger and causing irreparable damage to your relationship, you may consider being patient. Your show of grace will benefit you because it has an uncanny way of magnifying guilt. The trick is how to use this to your advantage without an overriding feeling of manipulation.

You may inadvertently or intentionally benefit from their feeling of guilt down the road. You’ll also find that grace will convert guilt into an expression of gratitude. This state of gratitude may have profound implications on your effectiveness as a leader who achieves outstanding results.

 

Copyright © 2016 Orlando Ceaser